From the Bay

From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

The Eastport Yacht Club Lights Parade Celebrates 40 Years!

By Cheryl Lecourt The 40th Anniversary of Eastport Yacht Club Lights Parade presented by the Long & Foster Real Estate Eastport Office is an event you won’t want to miss. On Saturday December 10th, Annapolis will be celebrating a momentous anniversary of one of its signature events, the Eastport Yacht Club Lights Parade. This much imitated statewide award winning event draws people from all over the region to Annapolis city dock, waterfront area restaurants, watering holes, hotels, homes, offices and Eastport’s street end parks. The event kicks off at 6 pm in Annapolis Harbor, and runs until 8pm. Anywhere from 40 to 50 uniquely lighted yachts will suddenly appear out of the dark, and parade up Spa Creek and Ego Alley providing a dazzling visual holiday light experience. Music, singing, and visual surprises are part of the event. The air is electric, and you will want to be part of the excitement. Come early in the afternoon and wander around City Dock and see many of the yachts in the process of decorating for the evening parade. Two fleets participate and switch places mid-event: one circling in front of Eastport Yacht Club, City Dock and the Naval Academy Seawall, the other circles the length of Spa Creek, inside the bridge. Serving as Diamond title sponsor for the Lights Parade for the third year in a row is the Long & Foster Real Estate Eastport Office. A choice viewing spot is on the bridge near their office. Parking and shuttle buses will be provided from the Naval Academy Stadium on Rowe Boulevard and West Street garages. To get up to date information on parking, shuttle buses, viewing spots and more check out the www.eastportyc.or/lights-parade and the city website www.Annapolis.gov

From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

What people don’t get about living aboard a boat

By Carrie Gentile Even though I am a sailor, I lived on a 42-foot powerboat on the Chesapeake for 10 years. It was wonderful. It was also cramped, sometimes damp, and inconvenient. I worked at a nine-to-five job, had pets, a husband, hobbies, creature comforts—all elements of a traditional lifestyle. Despite this, my friends, family, coworkers and acquaintances were intrigued by what they perceived as an irrational decision. How did I stay warm? How did I get to work? Are you able to watch Netflix? Am I sick of drinking rum? I asked a few fellow liveaboards if they, too, encountered a myriad of questions and had to dispel many myths about living afloat, either on a sailboat or powerboat. Here are some of our favorites: It’s all rum drinks, relaxation, and romantic sunsets. You’re on a boat, so that means there’s a constant stream of Jimmy Buffett tunes as we live like it’s always happy hour. In fact, our boat is our home, and therefore as home/boat owners, we have a running list of maintenance projects and household chores. Boat plumbing systems tend to be less reliable than their house counterparts. We tend to spend hours upkeeping the hoses, heads, bilges, and pipes. If it snows, all this becomes much more urgent to make sure nothing freezes. It does take electrical systems knowledge and engine repair skills, lest you want to hire a professional for each unrecognizable sound or smell. Some mundane tasks become more onerous once living on the water such as laundry. Most liveaboards have to use laundromats, which to me is the biggest downside to this otherwise appealing lifestyle. If you don’t have a working shower or are conserving water, showering means walking down the dock to the marina head, sometimes in the middle of the winter on…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

It’s Show Time on the Bay

By Lani Gering I remember the days when we wouldn’t miss a sailboat boat show that went down within our commuting area unless the weather was close to hurricane status. Those were the days when my pal was on the hunt for a “bigger” boat and I was really fond of having every latest *saily gadget for the galley and just the right splash jacket for the hanging locker. Not to mention seeing the latest and greatest in bottom paint, boat soap and other fancy cleaning gadgets and potions. Moving on to present day (15+ years)….I am still using many of the *saily gadgets and I definitely need a new splash jacket and the “bigger” sailboat could really use some of the latest and greatest in paint, soap and potions. This all being said, I believe we will head to Annapolis for the Sailboat Show this year. In full disclosure, we spend quite a bit of time in this Sailing Capital and it is one of my favorite places in the United States! I enlisted the help of our pals at Annapolis Boat Shows to get the scoop on the 2022 events. See below: The boating world will once again rejoice as fall approaches and visitors from the U.S. and abroad return to Annapolis for two iconic boat shows, the United States Powerboat Show (Oct. 6-9) and United States Sailboat Show (Oct. 13-17). This year, in addition to celebrating the return of international travel, the Annapolis Boat Shows will celebrate the 50th United States Powerboat Show. Each year, the team from the Annapolis Boat Shows transforms Annapolis Harbor into a floating showcase of new models of boats and innovative products. This year, the boat shows will again have an impressive lineup of new and premiering boats. Shoreside exhibit areas and tents…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

The Skinny on Shallow Water: Protected but Vulnerable

By Dave Secor Kayaking is such a simple and therapeutic pleasure. Shallow waters abound in the Chesapeake Bay, and car roof racks attest to its popularity. In tidal creeks, rivers and protected bays, passive glides bring nature’s envelopment. Arms work against wind and tide. Immersion and exertion shed worries in the kayak’s wake. These skinny waters are also therapeutic for the Bay itself. They are its highest-functioning habitats: nurseries for fish, beds for reefs and underwater grasses, and incubators for the forage species that sustain oysters, crabs, fish and wildlife. Little wonder then that these shallow waters receive the government’s highest safeguards. The Chesapeake Bay Program applies its most stringent water quality standards to two classes of habitats: skinny tidal waters, including shoreline waters less than 2 meters deep, and migratory spawning reaches and nurseries, which are mostly shallow, upper estuarine waters where striped bass, perch, shad and other fish reproduce. Twenty years ago, I worked with a team to develop these protections, and they have stood up well. Still, left in the wake of that effort are larger perils to skinny waters: climate change, invasive species and development in coastal rural counties. Along the shores of the Potomac River, we summertime paddlers share skinny waters with countless 2-inch juvenile striped bass. Their numbers vary wildly year-to-year, depending on springtime egg and larval survival. Upriver to Nice Bridge, large females cast billions of eggs to the whims of spring weather. Early mortality is brutal, and bass have adapted by spawning repeatedly over long lifespans. A 30-year-old striped bass has more than 20 times at bat to replace herself. Enter climate change. Spring is now a less predictable transition between seasons, narrowing the window of favorable conditions. Combined with recent overfishing and disease, most females get only one or two times at bat. Protecting the nursery function of skinny…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

Keeping Your Boat and Body Cool

By Kelsey Bonham Every Chesapeake Bay sailor knows how hot and sticky a long day on the water can be, but not only can it be unpleasant, it can also be dangerous. As the dog days of summer approach, these tips will help you keep your decks, cabin, and crew cool, making your sailing experience more enjoyable for everyone. Invest in a Bimini or Canvas Tarp Shade is crucial. Biminis are one of the best ways to keep your cockpit shielded from the sun, but if a bimini isn’t in your future, consider purchasing or fashioning a canvas tarp that can be suspended over the cockpit. If you’re feeling really thrifty, an old sail might even do the trick. Open Your Hatches Strategically Cabins are notorious for turning into saunas. Opening any hatches will make a difference but creating a tunnel of airflow through the cabin is best. A combination of an open foredeck hatch with an open companionway will help a breeze flow through most efficiently. Try a Windscoop If opening the hatches alone doesn’t invite enough air down below, consider investing in a windscoop or fashioning one yourself to help guide the breeze into your hatches. Cook on Deck Every galley chef knows how quickly a stove can turn into a heater. If you have a removable stove, bring it on deck and enjoy practicing your culinary skills with a view of your anchorage. If your stove is firmly installed into your galley, consider grilling out over the transom or serving no-cook meals instead. Keep Wet Gear Outside Heat isn’t the only thing keeping you hot—humidity is also a major factor, especially on the Bay. If you have wet gear, whether it’s foul weather gear you stripped off following an afternoon downpour or a collection of sopping swimsuits,…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

Abandoned Boats in the Bay Waterways – A Big Problem

By Whitney Pipkin, Bay Journal News Service Whether lurking as hazards beneath the water’s surface or becoming eyesores as they drift ashore, abandoned boats are a growing problem in Chesapeake Bay waters — especially in Virginia. And they’re not as easy to get out of the water as they were to put in. The U.S. Coast Guard has documented 170 abandoned and derelict vessels in Virginia waters since 2013, and state officials are building a list of even more that need to be removed. Some boats are set adrift by storms and, in the absence of a fastidious owner, stay that way for months or years. Recreators who bought a boat during the pandemic may be realizing they no longer want to maintain one. But one of the biggest concerns involves boats built during the affordable fiberglass boat boom that began in the 1960s, which are reaching the end of their lifespans. The number being abandoned appears to be on the rise. “When luxury is built in,” reads one 1980 ad for a 37-foot cruiser with a fiberglass hull, “it doesn’t wear out.” Made with reinforced plastic-and-glass materials, these boats don’t blend into a marshy shoreline as they decompose, like their wooden forebears. Instead, they persist in the environment, shedding microplastic particles and leaching toxic materials over time. The boats often end up left in a marina or set adrift because the owner feels like there aren’t other options for disposal. Getting rid of a defunct boat can easily cost more than the boat is worth. Unlike old cars, whose mostly metal frames can be sold or donated for scrap materials, the fiberglass components of a boat “are practically worthless and tend to cost more to remove, prepare for disposal and dispose of than their parts are worth,” states a…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

Start Sailing Now – What A Great Sport!

By Beth Crabtree Meet Mark Burrows – The summer before I graduated from college, a friend from school invited me to help him race a Flying Scot in Long Beach, CA. I had no experience, but he said it wasn’t necessary. The race started, and we made our way around the track. At some point, a support boat came by with a cooler of beer and handed a couple to us. I thought, “What a great sport!” A month or so later, the same friend invited me to go with him and a few others out to Catalina Island. It was a great trip with good wind, rolling seas, and an amazing destination. I was hooked. Magazine subscriptions and books followed to learn more about it. After settling in Virginia, I picked up a copy of SpinSheet in Deltaville, and I became a sailing magazine junkie. As I read the sailing magazines, the lifestyle looked amazing with the destinations all over the world. The projects looked interesting and doable. Something that kept popping up in the articles was to contact a local sailing club about becoming a crew member. It sounded sketchy, but I tried a couple of clubs and got some rides. Boat ownership and sailing on OPBs I learned to sail aboard Flying Scots at Belle Haven Marina’s sailing school on the Potomac River. After taking lessons I bought a trailerable Hunter 26 named Proposal. I was starting a family, and it seemed the right size. I had a lot of fun and learned a lot on that boat, but I didn’t keep it too long as that same family and my career took up more and more time. When I sold the boat, I learned that it’s a terrible thing watching someone drive away with your first…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

The Black Diamond Disaster of 1865

By Bob Tagert One of the great treats of living in this area is the huge amount of history that lies at our fingertips. This past month we ventured to Colton Point on the Potomac River near St. Clements Island and visited the St. Clements Island Museum for the wreath laying ceremony dedicated to the men who lost their lives in the Black Diamond Disaster in 1865. Billed as “The forgotten tragedy on the Potomac”, there is an amazing story behind these casualties. Among the other stories of the German submarine that lies in 95 feet of water near Piney Point, Maryland and the ships in Mallows Bay that lie in shallow water near Charles County, Maryland and is regarded as the “largest shipwreck fleet in the Western Hemisphere” and is described as a “ship graveyard”, the Black Diamond is another disaster after the Civil War. In April 1865, following the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, the Quartermaster Corps sent the barge Black Diamond to the lower Potomac River to stand on picket duty off of St. Clements Island. Her main job was to keep John Wilkes Booth from crossing the Potomac River into Virginia as he was fleeing from the law. About the same time, the side wheel steamer Massachusetts set sail for Fortress Monroe in the Hamptons Road area of the Commonwealth from Alexandria, Virginia. On board were several Federal soldiers who were returning from sick leave as well as some recently paroled prisoners of war. In a huge mishap around midnight, the Massachusetts rammed the Black Diamond on the port side near the boiler, sinking her in a matter of minutes. Although the Massachusetts remained on the scene to pick up survivors until daybreak, eighty seven lives were lost. Despite the damage to her bow, she continued…

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Spring Sailboat Show Returns to Historic Downtown Annapolis

By Michaela Watkins The Annapolis Spring Sailboat Show is set to return to historic downtown Annapolis April 29 – May 1. The show will feature new and brokerage boats including catamarans, monohulls, racing boats, family cruisers, daysailers, and inflatables. While climbing aboard an impressive line-up of sailboats is always a major draw, there is so much more to see. Guests are invited to meet with boating clubs and charters companies, shop gear and equipment, and catch up with marine professionals and sailing friends. Novice and seasoned sailors alike are welcome to expand their horizons with a number of educational opportunities: First Sail Workshop allows first-time sailors to learn the basics and experience the joy of sailing in a 45-minute classroom session followed by 90 minutes on the water with American Sailing Association accredited instructors provided by Sailtime. Cruisers University is a classroom-based educational opportunity for bluewater sailors. Its comprehensive curriculum offers a complete range of cruising topics to prepare cruisers to live aboard a boat and begin their boating adventures with confidence. Courses include marine weather forecasting, navigation techniques, diesel maintenance, heavy weather sailing, budgeting, and more. In collaboration with Chesapeake Bay Magazine and Annapolis School of Seamanship, the show also brings a variety of free seminars. Learn from professional captains and experts about a variety of how-to and where-to-go topics including Docking De-Stressed, Get Your Captain’s License, Weekends on the Water – Cruising to towns in the Upper & Middle Bay, Lessons from Sailors Who Log 100 Days on the Water Each Year, and How to Anchor Your Boat. In addition to boarding beautiful sailboats, guests of the Spring Sailboat Show may get behind the wheel on land at the BMW exhibit. Browse the all-new, fully electric iX on display or sign up to test drive the iX, i4,…

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From the Bay, From the Bay to the Blue Ridge

Annual Annapolis Oyster Roast & Sock Burning

By Timothy Wheeler “Say goodbye to winter, only deck shoes we wear! Though the socks we burn leave a stink in the air!” So reads the poem recited each year as hundreds of Annapolitans and visitors gather around a waterfront bonfire at the Annapolis Maritime Museum to burn their smelliest, winter-worn socks. After a hiatus during the pandemic, the Annapolis Oyster Roast & Sock Burning is back to celebrate the maritime culture of the Annapolis community and all things Chesapeake Bay. Join us on Saturday, March 19th from 12:00-4:00 PM as we burn our socks during the spring equinox. Tickets are now sold out for both General Admission and People’s Choice. Participants will enjoy all-you-can-eat oysters, oyster shucking contests, family activities, and live music by the Eastport Oyster Boys and Naptown Brass Band. Beverages and other food will be available onsite for purchase.  All of this takes place on the Museum’s waterfront campus overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, including complimentary boat rides and skipjack tours. The sock burning tradition was started in the late 1970’s by local Eastport shipwrights who were fed-up with the winter weather. After an exceptionally cold, snowy season, a small group gathered to celebrate the coming of spring by burning their old socks and promising to forgo sock wearing until the cold weather returned. Today, this quirky Annapolis tradition lives on at the Annapolis Maritime Museum at the Annual Oyster Roast & Sock Burning, where guests can take part in this decades-long tradition that welcomes both the spring and the Annapolis boating season. “There is nothing more authentic and unique to Annapolis than the ritual of burning socks, started right here in Annapolis,” said Alice Estrada, President/CEO of the Museum. “This beloved event brings the community together and raises funds for our important environmental education programs, which…

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