Pandemic Spanish Flu of 1918

by ©2018 Sarah Becker   Pandemic Spanish Flu of 1918 Hospital reports of nursing shortages are nothing new.  Neither is flu season.  Influenza is a communicable, highly contagious, disease transmitted through droplet infection–or—by touching articles contaminated with infected nasaldischarge.  Contaminated hands, hand railings, enclosed air systems, populated school buses and military barracks are all breeding […]

Howard Rogers – Maritime Artist and Renaissance Man

By Bob Tagert Howard Rogers – Maritime Artist and Renaissance Man Twenty-one years ago, the bridge over Spa Creek that connects Annapolis to Eastport, Maryland was closed for needed repairs. The bridge is the main connection between Annapolis and Eastport and having it closed insured that an economic loss was certain. A group of sailors […]

Tariffs – Then & Now

by ©2018 Sarah Becker Tariffs – Then & Now “On 6 July, the U.S. imposed 25% tariffs on $34bn in Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to hit back with levies on the same amount of U.S. exports to China,” London’s The Guardian reported.  “In response, the White House released a wide-ranging list of Chinese goods, from […]

To Infinity and Beyond

To Infinity and Beyond By Sarah Becker ©2018 What is it about outer space, space flight that captures the American fancy?  Who does not remember the 1986 Challenger STS-51-L disaster?  Or the 2003 Columbia STS-107 shuttle tragedy?  All who perished journeyed so we could share the joy of scientific discovery.   Whether the subject is […]

They’re Burning Down the House!

They’re Burning Down the House! By Sarah Becker ©2018 President Donald Trump (R-NY) has done it again, he’s muddled history. On May 25, in a tetchy telephone conversation with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Trump unthinkingly said it was the Canadians, not the British who burned The White House in 1814. The British assault on […]

Hemp’s Hectic History

By Sarah Becker ©2018 Hemp’s Hectic History “History doesn’t drive economies anymore…,” George Mason University economist Stephen Fuller told the Washingtonian in May. He may be right. The Alexandria Convention and Visitors Bureau’s slogan, Still Making History gave way to the ACVA’s Funside of the Potomac years ago. How does Alexandria describe today’s customer groups, […]

The Entrepreneurial Woman

The Entrepreneurial Woman by Sarah Becker ©2018   Alexandria’s good ‘ole boys rarely admit it, but much of the property upon which Alexandria was established—property north of Hunting Creek to a line approximating present-day Queen Street—was first owned by a female. Margaret Brent, an attorney and femme sole, took ownership of the land in 1654. […]

The South Secedes!

by Sarah Becker ©2018   The South Secedes!               More Civil War battles were fought in Virginia than in any other state. The majority of the clashes occurred between Washington, D.C. and Richmond, an interesting fact given Virginia’s initial reluctance to secede. “In spite of all excitement, rash conduct, and reckless language indulged in […]

Dog Gone it America, Read!

Read America! By Parker A. Poodle™ Hello, Alexandria!  I, Parker A. Poodle, am reporting from the backseat of my mistress’ car. We have just crossed the 14th Street Bridge en route to The White House. Massachusetts-er John Adams—slaveless property owner, husband of Abigail, father of three and dog owner of two—was the first President to […]

George Washington’s Death and Holiday

by Sarah Becker ©2017 George Washington’s Death and Holiday “Remembering that all must die…I hope you will bear the misfortune with that fortitude and complacency of mind, that become a man and a Christian,” General George Washington wrote in 1777.  Washington died at home on December 14, 1799, at age 67.  His death surprised the […]