Steamboats: Rumsey and Fulton

Robert Fulton

Steamboats: Rumsey and Fulton By Sarah Becker © 2017 The discovery of the Mariner’s Compass Gave Commerce to the World…and the Introduction of the Creative System of Canals…will Give an Agricultural Polish To every Acre of America,” artist turned inventor Robert Fulton wrote President George Washington in 1796. Fulton, born in Pennsylvania, moved to London […]

Presidential Elections

history-president-elect-donald-j-trump-1946

Presidential Elections by ©2016 Sarah Becker   “Differences in political opinions are as unavoidable as, to a certain point, they may perhaps be necessary,” President George Washington wrote Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton on August 26, 1792, “but it is to be regretted, exceedingly, that subjects cannot be discussed with temper [calmness] on the […]

Mosby’s Confederacy

civil-discourse-12-16

By Doug Coleman MOSBY’S CONFEDERACY Anyone driving around in the Warrenton and Middleburg area has probably seen the signs letting them know they are in the “Mosby Heritage Area.” Once known as “Mosby’s Confederacy” it was made up of Loudoun, Fairfax, Fauquier, Clark, Warren and Prince William County. So, who was Mosby? John Singleton Mosby […]

Red Jacket & Religion

history-redjacket

Red Jacket & Religion By Sarah Becker ©2016   In 1754, during the French and Indian War, Benjamin Franklin presented his Plan of the Union to seven colonies at a meeting in Albany, New York. He acknowledged the Iroquois League, its national structure then explained his proposal. His Plan rejected, the Articles of Confederation followed […]

Law of Coverture

history-margaret-chase-smith-for-pres

Law of Coverture By Sarah Becker © 2016   “By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law,” British jurist Sir William Blackstone said in 1765,” that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband: […]

Blockading the Potomac

civil-discourse-sneden-cockpit-point

BLOCKADING THE POTOMAC By Doug Coleman On of the immediate problems presented to newly seceded Virginia was to secure her waterways from Federal incursion. The first shots fired in Virginia were at the little-known battle of Gloucester Point on the York River. The Confederates were in the process of constructing a fort there, which when […]

Brexit/Texit

history-3

By Sarah Becker ©2016 On June 23, 2016 more than 30 million British voters participated in a referendum, an electoral review of Great Britain’s 43-year membership in the European Union. They chose to exit 52% to 48%. Not unlike America’s 2016 election campaign, voters’ decision-variables included: national identity and culture; income and wealth; immigration, borders […]

Nathan Bedford Forrest, Confederate Badass

civil-discourse-nathan-bedford-forrest

By Doug Coleman NATHAN BEDFORD FORREST, CONFEDERATE BADASS In the course of making his iconic series on the Civil War, Ken Burns interviewed historian Shelby Foote. Foote recalled Nathan Bedford Forrest as quite the compelling character, stating, ” I think the war produced two authentic geniuses. One of them was [Nathan Bedford Forrest]. The other […]

Saving Appomattox

CIVIL DISCOURSE By Doug Coleman SAVING APPOMATTOX On June 17, 2015, an angry racist punk named Dylann Roof shot and killed nine African-Americans at a prayer service at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina; he left one more wounded. Roof liked to post selfies posing with the Confederate flag, which in his […]

Civil War Artillery Day at Fort Ward

Civil War Artillery Day at Fort Ward   Learn about the role and equipment of Civil War artillerymen in the Defenses of Washington on Saturday, September 10, when Fort Ward Museum presents Civil War Artillery Day.  This free living history program is from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and will appeal to Civil War enthusiasts of all […]