Andrew Adkins

By Sarah Becker ©2017      Alexandria’s Redevelopment and Housing Authority [ARHA] follows the money. Least cost analysis has replaced cost beneficial. Lesser payments are negotiated in lieu of property taxes [PILT]. Soft loans include below market interest rates and subsidies, to the extent they are acknowledged, are non-neutral. Opportunity costs, lost opportunity costs especially […]

Don’t Hit it with a Hammer!

By Doug Coleman DON’T HIT IT WITH A HAMMER Many years ago I read the memoirs of a soldier stationed at Fort Worth. He talks about artillery practice and describes the rounds whistling over the Valley of Hunting Creek to land harmlessly in some farmer’s field in Franconia. He could not have known of Samuel […]

FITZ JOHN PORTER, SCAPEGOAT

By Doug Coleman FITZ JOHN PORTER, SCAPEGOAT Fitz John Porter is a hero you have never heard of. In 1861-62, he was what the Union needed – a general officer with more competence than ego. Born in New Hampshire in 1822, he graduated West Point in 1845, just in time for the Mexican War. He […]

WWI: The Centennial

By Sarah Becker ©2017 WWI: The Centennial “Woodrow Wilson may well have witnessed more dramatic changes in national and global affairs than any other president since [George] Washington,” Carter Smith wrote. “He entered Presidential office [on March 4, 1913] a highly regarded reformer.” His foreign policy was not nearly as aggressive as his domestic. Then […]

Poodle-doo

Poodle-doo Written by Parker A. Poodle ™ ©2017 Sarah Becker February 2017   The weather is warming, springtime awaits, and the dogwoods debate their blooms. I welcome the change of seasons. March 2 is Read Across America Day and I invite all to sit with me beneath the trees, a book in paw or hand. […]

Traitor’s Hill

By Doug Coleman TRAITOR’S HILL Samuel Cooper was born in New York in 1898, the son of a revolutionary serving as a major in Knox’s artillery. He died on Cooper’s Hill a Virginian and the highest ranking officer in the Confederate army, senior even to Lee. He entered the U.S. Military Academy at age 14, […]

Steamboats: Rumsey and Fulton

Steamboats: Rumsey and Fulton By Sarah Becker © 2017 The discovery of the Mariner’s Compass Gave Commerce to the World…and the Introduction of the Creative System of Canals…will Give an Agricultural Polish To every Acre of America,” artist turned inventor Robert Fulton wrote President George Washington in 1796. Fulton, born in Pennsylvania, moved to London […]

Presidential Elections

Presidential Elections by ©2016 Sarah Becker   “Differences in political opinions are as unavoidable as, to a certain point, they may perhaps be necessary,” President George Washington wrote Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton on August 26, 1792, “but it is to be regretted, exceedingly, that subjects cannot be discussed with temper [calmness] on the […]

Mosby’s Confederacy

By Doug Coleman MOSBY’S CONFEDERACY Anyone driving around in the Warrenton and Middleburg area has probably seen the signs letting them know they are in the “Mosby Heritage Area.” Once known as “Mosby’s Confederacy” it was made up of Loudoun, Fairfax, Fauquier, Clark, Warren and Prince William County. So, who was Mosby? John Singleton Mosby […]

Red Jacket & Religion

Red Jacket & Religion By Sarah Becker ©2016   In 1754, during the French and Indian War, Benjamin Franklin presented his Plan of the Union to seven colonies at a meeting in Albany, New York. He acknowledged the Iroquois League, its national structure then explained his proposal. His Plan rejected, the Articles of Confederation followed […]