The American Whiskey Trail

History – The American Whiskey Trail by © 2016 Sarah Becker How do lawyers and historians pass their respective bar exams? Lawyers mostly study hard. Spirited historians sip booze. The American Whiskey Trail, championed by the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, includes local sites such as George Washington’s Mount Vernon Distillery and Gadsby’s […]

Robert E. Lee & the Mexican War

By Sarah Becker “Success in the Mexican War,” General Winfield Scott exclaimed, “was largely due to Robert E. Lee’s skill, valor and undaunted energy.” Robert E. Lee, the fifth child of Revolutionary War hero Henry “Light-horse Harry” Lee and his second wife Ann Hill Carter, was born January 19, 1807. Of noble descent, he spent […]

Conservation as a National Duty

by Sarah Becker © 2016 Conservation as a National Duty      “The fame of President Theodore Roosevelt has grown in lustre and stature as the years have passed,” President Herbert Hoover said in December 1932. “His accomplishments…bulk large in the pages of history.” The occasion: acceptance of the 1931 deed to Theodore Roosevelt Island. The […]

What Pet Should I Get?

Written by Parker A. Poodle TM a.k.a. Sarah Becker © 2016 Copyright ©2016 Sarah Becker Walk with me and Oh, the Places You’ll Go! No leash is needed, only your imagination and the love of rhyme. Dr. Seuss is back, with a newly discovered manuscript, a new book—What Pet Should I Get?—published from the grave. […]

Evolution

By Sarah Becker © 2016 It is an irony of history that two of the 19th century’s most epochal figures, Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln, were born on the same day: February 12, 1809. Charles Darwin, a rich Brit with an instinct for discovery, forever changed the study of biology. In 1859 Darwin published his […]

The History of Human Trafficking

By Sarah Becker Human slavery did not end with the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863. Today human trafficking is a $32 billion-a-year industry. “Money should be able to buy a lot of things, but it should never, ever be able to buy another human being,” Secretary of State, former Boston-area Prosecutor John F. Kerry noted. By […]

History/Destruction of Art

by Sarah Becker “The art of a nation is one of its most refining influences, and is the highest expression of its civilization and culture,” The New York Times wrote in 1918. “Artistic endeavor must be preserved, for the history of a nation cannot be written without due regard to its artistic attainments: in many […]

Benjamin Hallowell

By Sarah Becker When Quakers Benjamin Hallowell and William Stabler established the Alexandria Philosophical Society in 1832 few knew that Hallowell, an educator, would emerge a nationally recognized man of science. Hallowell, originally from Pennsylvania, came to Alexandria in 1824 to open a school. His boarding school was initially located on Oronoco Street, an “unhealthy […]

Immigration

By Sarah Becker “Forebears created this Nation,” President Lyndon Johnson said on January 20, 1965. “In each generation, with toil and tears, we have to earn our heritage again…They came here—the exile and the stranger, brave but frightened—to find a place where a man could be his own man. They made a covenant with this […]

The Confederate Statue

By Sarah Becker In college my roommate, an Arkansan and I often discussed southern history. One afternoon—I will never forget—she turned her tiny torso and snapped: “Yankees do not understand! America did not fight a Civil War. It was the War of Northern Aggression.” Aggression was news to me. I am a Hoosier by birth. […]